Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Age and Tectonic Significance of Permian Granites in Western Zanskar, High Himalaya

S. R. Noble, M. P. Searle and C. B. Walker
The Journal of Geology
Vol. 109, No. 1 (January 2001), pp. 127-135
DOI: 10.1086/317966
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/317966
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Age and Tectonic Significance of Permian Granites in Western
Zanskar, High Himalaya
Preview not available

Abstract

Abstract Field and U‐Pb geochronology data are presented for two new occurrences of Permian Himalayan granites, at Parkatchic (at ca. 270 Ma) and Sankoo (at \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage[OT2,OT1]{fontenc} \newcommand\cyr{ \renewcommand\rmdefault{wncyr} \renewcommand\sfdefault{wncyss} \renewcommand\encodingdefault{OT2} \normalfont \selectfont} \DeclareTextFontCommand{\textcyr}{\cyr} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} \landscape $268\pm 5$ \end{document} Ma), western Zanskar. The granites were deformed during Late Eocene–Early Miocene metamorphism, and K‐Ar and Ar‐Ar systematics of micas and amphiboles were reset, as indicated by 40Ar/39Ar mica ages of 19–13 Ma. Permian granites from the High Himalaya were previously known only from one location but are significant because they are believed to be related to lower crustal melting that accompanied mafic volcanism (Panjal Trap volcanics) along the north Indian plate margin during rifting of Gondwana.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9