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Aligning Multiple Research Techniques in Cognitive Neuroscience: Why Is It Important?

William Bechtel
Philosophy of Science
Vol. 69, No. S3 (September 2002), pp. S48-S58
DOI: 10.1086/341767
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/341767
Page Count: 11
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Aligning Multiple Research Techniques in Cognitive Neuroscience: Why Is It Important?
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Abstract

Abstract The need to align multiple experimental procedures and produce converging results so as to demonstrate that the phenomenon under investigation is real and not an artifact is a commonplace both in scientific practice and discussions of scientific methodology (Campbell and Stanley 1963; Wimsatt 1981). Although sometimes this is the purpose of aligning techniques, often there is a different purpose—multiple techniques are sought to supply different perspectives on the phenomena under investigation that need to be integrated to answer the questions scientists are asking. After introducing this function, I will illustrate it by considering three of the major techniques in cognitive neuroscience for linking cognitive function with neural structure.

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