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Decision Making in Information‐Rich Environments: The Role of Information Structure

Nicholas H. Lurie
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 30, No. 4 (March 2004), pp. 473-486
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.1086/380283
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/380283
Page Count: 14
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Item Type
Article
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Decision Making in Information‐Rich Environments: The Role of Information Structure
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Abstract

Today’s consumers are often overloaded with information. This article argues that traditional approaches to measuring the amount of information in a choice set fail to account for important structural dimensions of information and may therefore incorrectly predict information overload. Two experiments show that a structural approach to measuring information, such as information theory, is better able to predict information overload and that information structure also has important implications for information acquisition. A Monte‐Carlo simulation, in which decision rules are applied to multiple information environments, shows that the amount of information processing mediates the relationship between information structure and information overload.

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