Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Seed Surface Sculpturing and Its Systematic Significance in Gilia (Polemoniaceae) and Segregate Genera

Leigh A. Johnson, Katherine H. Huish and J. Mark Porter
International Journal of Plant Sciences
Vol. 165, No. 1 (January 2004), pp. 153-172
DOI: 10.1086/380748
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/380748
Page Count: 20
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Seed Surface Sculpturing and Its Systematic Significance in Gilia (Polemoniaceae) and Segregate Genera
Preview not available

Abstract

Seed surface sculpturing was examined comparatively from 46 species of Gilia sensu lato and 32 species representing other genera of Polemonioideae. Character states were defined for three primary sculptural characters (cell shape, anticlinal wall fusion, and anticlinal wall relief) and three secondary sculptural characters (periclinal wall embossing, microsculptural relief, and macroprotrusive elements). These surface features define morphotypes that correspond to several monophyletic groups recently defined for Polemoniaceae, including Saltugilia, Lathrocasis, Aliciella, Giliastrum, and a clade comprising Gilia sensu stricto, Allophyllum, Collomia, and Navarretia. Other groups, including Linanthus and Dayia, had diverse seed morphotypes. Considered individually across a phylogenetic hypothesis for Polemonioideae, five of the six surface characters were homoplastic, with consistency indices ranging from 0.71 to 0.88. When applied to specific hypotheses of relationship embedded in two alternative classifications for Gilia sensu lato, seed surface morphotypes agreed with or were equivocal regarding groups also indicated by comparative DNA sequence analyses but were only equivocal at best for alternative groups proposed on the basis of “evolutionary systematics.”

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20