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What Is Speciation and How Should We Study It?

John J. Wiens
The American Naturalist
Vol. 163, No. 6 (June 2004), pp. 914-923
DOI: 10.1086/386552
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/386552
Page Count: 10
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What Is Speciation and How Should We Study It?
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Abstract

Abstract: To understand speciation, we first need to know what species are. Yet debates over species concepts have seemed endless, with little obvious relevance to the study of speciation. Recently, there has been progress in resolving these debates, favoring a lineage‐based, evolutionary species concept. This progress calls for reconsideration of the study of speciation. Traditional speciation research based on the biological species concept has led to great advances in understanding how nonallopatric speciation occurs and how species diverge and remain separate from each other. However, this research has neglected the question of how new species arise in the first place for the most common geographic mode (allopatric). A new and very different research program is needed to understand the ecological and evolutionary processes that split an ancestral species into new allopatric lineages. This research program will connect speciation to many other fundamental questions in evolutionary biology, ecology, biogeography, and conservation biology.

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