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The Effect of a Delay between Choice and Consumption on Consumption Enjoyment

Stephen M. Nowlis, Naomi Mandel and Deborah Brown McCabe
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 31, No. 3 (December 2004), pp. 502-510
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.1086/425085
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/425085
Page Count: 9
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The Effect of a Delay between Choice and Consumption on Consumption Enjoyment
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Abstract

A consumer choosing a product must often wait before consuming it. In this article, we consider the consequences of waiting on consumption enjoyment. We propose that the effect of a delay on consumption enjoyment depends on both the negative utility of the wait itself and on the positive utility of anticipating a pleasant consumption experience. These factors exert different degrees of influence, depending on characteristics of the decision task. The results of three studies suggest that a delay increases consumption enjoyment for pleasurable products when actual consumption occurs, but decreases enjoyment for imagined consumption. Furthermore, the vividness of the awaited product moderates these effects.

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