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Thermal Acclimation of Metabolic Rate May Be Seasonally Dependent in the Subtropical Anuran Latouche’s Frog (Rana latouchii, Boulenger)

Yuan‐Mou Chang and Ping‐Chun Lucy Hou
Physiological and Biochemical Zoology: Ecological and Evolutionary Approaches
Vol. 78, No. 6 (November/December 2005), pp. 947-955
DOI: 10.1086/432924
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/432924
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Thermal Acclimation of Metabolic Rate May Be Seasonally Dependent in the Subtropical Anuran Latouche’s Frog (Rana latouchii, Boulenger)
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Abstract

Abstract We tested the hypothesis that the lack of metabolic thermal acclimation ability in tropical and subtropical amphibians is dependent on season and investigated the effects of body size, sex, time of day, and season on metabolic rates in Rana latouchii. The males were acclimated at 15°, 20°, and 25°C, and their oxygen consumption was measured at 15°, 20°, 25°, and 30°C in all four seasons, with the exception that we did not measure oxygen consumption at 30°C in winter frogs. We also acclimated the males at 30°C in summer for investigating diel variation of metabolic rate. The females were acclimated at 20° and 25°C, and their oxygen consumption was measured at 15°, 20°, 25°, and 30°C in summer. Our results showed that metabolic rates of R. latouchii differed by time of day, season, and acclimation temperature but did not differ by sex if the results were adjusted for differences in body mass. Summer males exhibited a 26%–48% increase in metabolic rates from the lowest values in the seasons. There was a trend of increased oxygen consumption in cold‐acclimated males, but it was significant only at 15° and 25°C in summer, autumn, and winter. These results support the hypothesis that thermal acclimation of metabolism is seasonally dependent, which has not been reported in other tropical and subtropical amphibians.

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