Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Nosocomial Methicillin‐Resistant and Methicillin‐Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Primary Bacteremia: At What Costs?

Murray A. Abramson , MD and Daniel J. Sexton , MD
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 20, No. 6 (June 1999), pp. 408-411
DOI: 10.1086/501641
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/501641
Page Count: 4
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Item Type
Article
References
Nosocomial Methicillin‐Resistant and Methicillin‐Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Primary Bacteremia: At What Costs?
Preview not available

Abstract

OBJECTIVE.  To determine the attributable hospital stay and costs for nosocomial methicillin‐sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin‐resistant S aureus (MRSA) primary bloodstream infections (BSIs). DESIGN.  Pairwise‐matched (1:1) nested case‐control study. SETTING.  University‐based tertiary‐care medical center. PATIENTS.  Patients admitted between December 1993 and March 1995 were eligible. Cases were defined as patients with a primary nosocomial S aureus BSI; controls were selected according to a priori matching criteria. MEASUREMENTS.  Length of hospital stay and total and variable direct costs of hospitalization. RESULTS.  The median hospital stay attributable to primary nosocomial MSSA BSI was 4 days, compared with 12 days for MRSA (P=.023). Attributable median total cost for MSSA primary nosocomial BSIs was $9,661 versus $27,083 for MRSA nosocomial infections (P=.043). CONCLUSION.  Nosocomial primary BSI due to S aureus significantly prolongs the hospital stay. Primary nosocomial BSIs due to MRSA result in an approximate threefold increase in direct cost, compared with those due to MSSA.

Page Thumbnails