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Development of Minimum Criteria for the Initiation of Antibiotics in Residents of Long‐Term–Care Facilities: Results of a Consensus Conference

Mark Loeb , MD, MSc, David W. Bentley , MD, Suzanne Bradley , MD, Kent Crossley , MD, Richard Garibaldi , MD, Nelson Gantz , MD, Allison McGeer , MD, Robert R. Muder , MD, Joseph Mylotte , MD, Lindsay E. Nicolle , MD, Brenda Nurse , MD, Shirley Paton , RN, Andrew E. Simor , MD, Philip Smith , MD and Larry Strausbaugh , MD
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 22, No. 2 (February 2001), pp. 120-124
DOI: 10.1086/501875
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/501875
Page Count: 5
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Development of Minimum Criteria for the Initiation of Antibiotics in Residents of Long‐Term–Care Facilities: Results of a Consensus Conference
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Abstract

ABSTRACT Establishing a clinical diagnosis of infection in residents of long‐term–care facilities (LTCFs) is difficult. As a result, deciding when to initiate antibiotics can be particularly challenging. This article describes the establishment of minimum criteria for the initiation of antibiotics in residents of LTCFs. Experts in this area were invited to participate in a consensus conference. Using a modified delphi approach, a questionnaire and selected relevant articles were sent to participants who were asked to rank individual signs and symptoms with respect to their relative importance. Using the results of the weighting by participants, a modification of the nominal group process was used to achieve consensus. Criteria for initiating antibiotics for skin and soft‐tissue infections, respiratory infections, urinary infections, and fever where the focus of infection is unknown were developed.

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