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Work‐Site–Based Influenza Vaccination in Healthcare and Non‐Healthcare Settings

Sarah J. D’Heilly , MD and Kristin L. Nichol , MD, MPH, MBA
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 25, No. 11 (November 2004), pp. 941-945
DOI: 10.1086/502324
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/502324
Page Count: 5
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Work‐Site–Based Influenza Vaccination in Healthcare and Non‐Healthcare Settings
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE.  To better understand work‐site–based programs for influenza vaccination. DESIGN.  Self‐administered, mailed questionnaire. SETTING.  Healthcare and non‐healthcare companies. PARTICIPANTS.  Random sample of 2,000 members of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses. RESULTS.  The response rate was 55%, and 88% of the respondents were employed by companies sponsoring work‐site influenza vaccination. Thirty‐two percent of respondents worked for healthcare and healthcare‐related services companies. Healthcare companies were more likely to sponsor worksite –based vaccination (94% vs 85%; P < .0001) compared with non‐healthcare companies. Healthcare companies were also more likely to encourage vaccination of high‐risk employees (70% vs 55%; P < .0001) and cover its cost (86% vs 61%; P < .0001). Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with highly successful vaccination. Being a healthcare‐ related company (OR, 2.1; CI95, 1.4–3.2; P < .0001), employers covering the vaccination cost (OR, 3.1; CI95, 1.4–6.6; P = .004), having more experience with work‐site vaccination (OR, 1.6; CI95, 1.0–2.4; P = .036), and management encouraging vaccination (OR, 2.6; CI95, 1.4–4.9; P = .002) were associated with highly successful programs. CONCLUSIONS.  Most of the occupational health nurses surveyed work for employers sponsoring work‐site vaccination, and 32% were employed by healthcare and related services companies. Healthcare companies were more likely to sponsor worksite–based vaccination and to vaccinate most of their employees; however, only 18% had vaccination rates higher than 50%. Strategies need to be developed to increase vaccination rates so that benefits of vaccination can be realized by employers and employees.

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