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The Impact of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia on Patient Outcomes: Mortality, Length of Stay, and Hospital Charges

Sara E. Cosgrove , MD, MS, Youlin Qi , MD, MPH, Keith S. Kaye , MD, MPH, Stephan Harbarth , MD, MS, Adolf W. Karchmer , MD and Yehuda Carmeli , MD, MPH
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 26, No. 2 (February 2005), pp. 166-174
DOI: 10.1086/502522
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/502522
Page Count: 9
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The Impact of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia on Patient Outcomes: Mortality, Length of Stay, and Hospital Charges
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE.  To evaluate the impact of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus on mortality, length of hospitalization, and hospital charges. DESIGN.  A cohort study of patients admitted to the hospital between July 1, 1997, and June 1, 2000, who had clinically significant S. aureus bloodstream infections. SETTING.  A 630‐bed, urban, tertiary‐care teaching hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. PATIENTS.  Three hundred forty‐eight patients with S. aureus bacteremia were studied; 96 patients had methicillin‐resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Patients with methicillin‐susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and MRSA were similar regarding gender, percentage of nosocomial acquisition, length of hospitalization, ICU admission, and surgery before S. aureus bacteremia. They differed regarding age, comorbidities, and illness severity score. RESULTS.  Similar numbers of MRSA and MSSA patients died (22.9% vs 19.8%; P = .53). Both the median length of hospitalization after S. aureus bacteremia for patients who survived and the median hospital charges after S. aureus bacteremia were significantly increased in MRSA patients (7 vs 9 days, P = .045; $19,212 vs $26,424, P = .008). After multivariable analysis, compared with MSSA bacteremia, MRSA bacteremia remained associated with increased length of hospitalization (1.29 fold; P = .016) and hospital charges (1.36 fold; P = .017). MRSA bacteremia had a median attributable length of stay of 2 days and a median attributable hospital charge of $6,916. CONCLUSION.  Methicillin resistance in S. aureus bacteremia is associated with significant increases in length of hospitalization and hospital charges.

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