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Prevalence and Nosocomial Spread of Methicillin‐Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Long‐Term–Care Facility in Slovenia

Tjasa Zohar Cretnik , MD, Petra Vovko , BSc, Matjaz Retelj , BSc, Borut Jutersek , BSc, Tatjana Harlander , MD, Jana Kolman , MD and Marija Gubina , PhD, MD
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 26, No. 2 (February 2005), pp. 184-190
DOI: 10.1086/502524
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/502524
Page Count: 7
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Prevalence and Nosocomial Spread of Methicillin‐Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Long‐Term–Care Facility in Slovenia
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Abstract

OBJECTIVES.  To determine the prevalence and incidence of methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization among residents and healthcare workers (HCWs) of a long‐term–care facility (LTCF), to assess possible routes of nosocomial spread, and to determine genetic relatedness of the isolates. SETTING.  A 351‐bed community LTCF for the elderly. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS.  Study investigators made two visits, approximately 3 months apart, to the facility. Samples for cultures were obtained from 107 residents during the first visit, 91 residents during the second visit, and 38 HCWs. RESULTS.  The prevalence of MRSA colonization among residents was 9.3% during the first visit and 8.8% during the second visit. During the first visit, two HCWs were colonized. During the second visit, no HCWs were colonized. The colonization of HCWs suggested a potential role in the transmission of MRSA. Molecular typing showed that two of three roommates in one room had the same strain, whereas two in another room differed from one another. All isolates, except one, belonged to two related clonal groups. It seems that the clonal group to which most isolates belonged had the greatest potential for spreading among both residents and HCWs. CONCLUSIONS.  Similar prevalence rates of MRSA colonization have been found in other European countries, but such studies have usually involved residents with better functional status than that of the participants in this study. Nosocomial spread of MRSA occurred in the facility examined, but not frequently. More attention should be focused on the hand hygiene of HCWs.

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