Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Reconfiguring Scholarly Authority: Reflections Based on Anthropological Studies in Norway

Marianne Gullestad
Current Anthropology
Vol. 47, No. 6 (December 2006), pp. 915-931
DOI: 10.1086/507199
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/507199
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Reconfiguring Scholarly Authority
Preview not available

Abstract

Social scientists loss of scholarly authority in the public realm has created a number of dilemmas. These dilemmas cannot be solved once and for all; they can only be lived in reflexive and multiperspectival research practices. The idea of a truthful and legitimate scholarly authority can be reconfigured in terms of research processes that are based on reflexive contextualization, cooperation with the people whose lifeworlds are examined, and dialogue with the general public. This reconfigured concept is grounded not in positions but in the quality of the relations (including uneasiness and conflict) between the scholar and his/her many interaction partners, including international colleagues, funding agencies, and the mass media. The provision of feedback and the dissemination of research findings to wider audiences is insurance against using other people as means rather than as ends and not examining real problems in the world. In other words, the quality of research relations is crucial for the development and maintenance of what C. Wright Mills called the sociological imagination.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17