Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Cosmetic Coloration in Birds: Occurrence, Function, and Evolution

Kaspar Delhey, Anne Peters and Bart Kempenaers
The American Naturalist
Vol. 169, No. S1, AVIAN COLORATION AND COLOR VISIONA Special Issue Edited by Andrew T. D. Bennett and Marc Théry (January 2007), pp. S145-S158
DOI: 10.1086/510095
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/510095
Page Count: 14

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Feathers, Plumage, Colors, Secretion, Birds, Signals, Uropygial gland, Breeding, Aviculture, Fats
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Cosmetic Coloration in Birds: Occurrence, Function, and Evolution
Preview not available

Abstract

Abstract: Colorful plumages are conspicuous social signals in birds, and the expression of these colors often reflects the quality of their bearers. Since mature feathers are dead structures, plumage color is often considered a static signal that does not change after molt. Feathers, however, can and do deteriorate between molts, and birds need to invest heavily in plumage maintenance. Here we argue that this need for preserving plumage condition and hence signaling content might have given rise to a novel type of sexual signal: cosmetic coloration. Cosmetic coloration occurs when the substances used for plumage maintenance change the color of the feathers, thereby becoming a signal themselves. Our review of cosmetic coloration in birds demonstrates that it is more widespread than currently realized, occurring in at least 13 bird families. Cosmetics have varied origins: they can be produced by the bird itself (uropygial and skin secretions, feather powder) or obtained from the environment (soil, iron oxide). Intraspecific patterns of cosmetic use (sex, age, and seasonal dimorphism) suggest that in many cases it may act as a sexual signal. However, more information is required on function, mechanisms, and costs to understand the evolution of cosmetic coloration and to confirm its signaling role.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14