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Associations Between Surgical Site Infection Risk and Hospital Operation Volume and Surgeon Operation Volume Among Hospitals in the Dutch Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Network

Jan Muilwijk , MD, Susan van den Hof , PhD and Jan C. Wille , PhD
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 28, No. 5 (May 2007), pp. 557-563
DOI: 10.1086/513613
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/513613
Page Count: 7
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Associations Between Surgical Site Infection Risk and Hospital Operation Volume and Surgeon Operation Volume Among Hospitals in the Dutch Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Network
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Abstract

Objective.  To examine the association between hospital operation volume and surgeon operation volume and the risk of surgical site infection (SSI). Design.  Prospective, multicenter cohort study based on surveillance data. Methods.  Data were obtained from the Dutch surveillance network for nosocomial infections (Preventie Ziekenhuisinfecties door Surveillance [PREZIES]) on 9 different types of orthopedic surgery, general surgery, and gynecology procedures performed during 1996‐2003. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent effect of hospital volume and surgeon volume on SSI risk. Results.  Hospital volume was not significantly associated with SSI risk for any of the selected procedures. Low surgeon volume was associated with an increased risk for an infection for 7 of 9 types of procedures, although this effect was statistically significant only for knee arthroplasty. For 4 procedures, the odds of exceeding the 75th percentile for duration of surgery were greater when the surgeon volume was low than when the surgeon volume was moderate or high. Conclusions.  Patients operated on by surgeons with a low operation volume seem to have a higher risk of developing an SSI with some procedures, particularly knee arthroplasty. The higher SSI risk for surgeons with a low operation volume is possibly partly mediated by the longer duration of surgery, a well‐known risk factor for development of SSI.

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