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Journal Article

Using Planned Enrichment Strategies with Direct Instruction to Improve Reading Fluency, Comprehension, and Attitude toward Reading: An Evidence‐Based Study

Sally M. Reis, D. Betsy McCoach, Michael Coyne, Fredric J. Schreiber, Rebecca D. Eckert and E. Jean Gubbins
The Elementary School Journal
Vol. 108, No. 1 (September 2007), pp. 3-23
DOI: 10.1086/522383
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/522383
Page Count: 22
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Using Planned Enrichment Strategies with Direct Instruction to Improve Reading Fluency, Comprehension, and Attitude toward Reading: An Evidence‐Based Study
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Abstract

Abstract In this study, we used a randomized design to investigate the effects of an enriched reading program on 226 urban elementary students’ (third through sixth grade) reading comprehension, oral reading fluency, and attitude toward reading in 2 elementary schools. The Schoolwide Enrichment Model in Reading Framework (SEM‐R) provides enriched reading experiences by exposing students to books in their areas of interest, daily supported independent reading of challenging self‐selected books using differentiated reading instruction, and interest‐based choice opportunities in reading. Prior to the study, a daily 1‐hour afternoon remedial literacy program was mandated by the district using workbooks and test‐preparation instruction in an attempt to increase reading scores. In the study, 14 teachers were randomly assigned to teach the treatment or a control group during this afternoon literacy block, and students were randomly assigned either to participate in the SEM‐R treatment group or to a control group that continued to receive remedial reading instruction and test preparation for 12 weeks. In addition, all students participated in the direct instructional approach, Success for All, for 90 minutes each morning. Results on oral reading fluency tests and attitudes toward reading scales indicated that students in the SEM‐R treatment group scored statistically significantly higher than control students in both oral reading fluency and attitude toward reading.

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