If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Case‐Control Study of Antibiotic Use and Subsequent Clostridium difficile–Associated Diarrhea in Hospitalized Patients

Roger Baxter , MD, G. Thomas Ray , MBA and Bruce H. Fireman , MA
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 29, No. 1 (January 2008), pp. 44-50
DOI: 10.1086/524320
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/524320
Page Count: 7
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:


Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Case‐Control Study of Antibiotic Use and Subsequent <em>Clostridium difficile</em>–Associated Diarrhea in Hospitalized Patients


Objective.  To determine which antibiotics increase or decrease the risk of Clostridium difficile–associated diarrhea (CDAD). Design.  Retrospective case‐control study. Setting.  Nonprofit, integrated healthcare delivery system in Northern California. Patients.  Study participants included patients with cases of hospital‐acquired CDAD that occurred during the period from 1999 through 2005 ( \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage[OT2,OT1]{fontenc} \newcommand\cyr{ \renewcommand\rmdefault{wncyr} \renewcommand\sfdefault{wncyss} \renewcommand\encodingdefault{OT2} \normalfont \selectfont} \DeclareTextFontCommand{\textcyr}{\cyr} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} \landscape $n=1,142$ \end{document} ) and control patients ( \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage[OT2,OT1]{fontenc} \newcommand\cyr{ \renewcommand\rmdefault{wncyr} \renewcommand\sfdefault{wncyss} \renewcommand\encodingdefault{OT2} \normalfont \selectfont} \DeclareTextFontCommand{\textcyr}{\cyr} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} \landscape $n=3,351$ \end{document} ) matched for facility, calendar quarter during which hospitalization occurred, diagnosis related group for the index hospitalization, and length of hospital stay. All case and control patients had received antibiotics in the 60 days before the index date. For each antibiotic, the risk of CDAD was examined in relation to whether the patient received the antibiotic, after adjustment for use of other antibiotics, demographic characteristics, selected health conditions, and use of healthcare services. Results.  The following antibiotics were associated with a significantly increased risk of acquiring CDAD: imipenem‐cilastin (odds ratio [OR], 2.77), clindamycin (OR, 2.31), cefuroxime (OR, 2.16), moxifloxacin (OR, 1.88), ceftazidime (OR, 1.82), cefpodoxime (OR, 1.58), ceftizoxime (OR, 1.57), and ceftriaxone (OR, 1.49). Metronidazole and doxycycline were associated with a significantly reduced risk of CDAD (OR for metronidazole, 0.67; OR for doxycycline, 0.41). Other factors associated with an increased risk of CDAD were older age, longer hospital stays, use of proton pump inhibitors, prior gastrointestinal disease, and prior infection (not including C. difficile infection.) Conclusions.  Some antibiotics appear to increase the risk of acquiring CDAD, notably clindamycin, third‐generation cephalosporins, and carbapenems, whereas metronidazole and doxycycline appear to be protective, compared with other antibiotics.

Page Thumbnails