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Ten Problems in History and Philosophy of Science

Peter Galison
Isis
Vol. 99, No. 1 (March 2008), pp. 111-124
DOI: 10.1086/587536
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/587536
Page Count: 14
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Ten Problems in History and Philosophy of Science
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Abstract

ABSTRACT In surveying the field of history and philosophy of science (HPS), it may be more useful just now to pose some key questions than it would be to lay out the sundry competing attempts to unify H and P. The ten problems this essay presents are grounded in a range of work of enormous interest—historical and philosophical work that has made use of productive categories of analysis: context, historicism, purity, and microhistory, to name but a few. What kind of account are we after—historically and philosophically—when we attempt to address science not as a vacuous generality but in its specific, local formation?

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