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How Can History of Science Matter to Scientists?

Jane Maienschein, Manfred Laubichler and Andrea Loettgers
Isis
Vol. 99, No. 2 (June 2008), pp. 341-349
DOI: 10.1086/588692
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/588692
Page Count: 9
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How Can History of Science Matter to Scientists?
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Abstract

ABSTRACT History of science has developed into a methodologically diverse discipline, adding greatly to our understanding of the interplay between science, society, and culture. Along the way, one original impetus for the then newly emerging discipline—what George Sarton called the perspective “from the point of view of the scientist”—dropped out of fashion. This essay shows, by means of several examples, that reclaiming this interaction between science and history of science yields interesting perspectives and new insights for both science and history of science. The authors consequently suggest that historians of science also adopt this perspective as part of their methodological repertoire.

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