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Implementation of an Industrial Systems-Engineering Approach to Reduce the Incidence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection

Robert R. Muder MD, Candace Cunningham RN, Ellesha McCray RN, MBA, Cheryl Squier RN, Peter Perreiah MBA, Rajiv Jain MD, Ronda L. Sinkowitz-Cochran MPH and John A. Jernigan MD
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 29, No. 8 (August 2008), pp. 702-708
DOI: 10.1086/589981
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/589981
Page Count: 14
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Implementation of an Industrial Systems-Engineering Approach to Reduce the Incidence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection
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Abstract

Objective.  To measure the effectiveness of an industrial systems-engineering approach to a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevention program. Design.  Before-after intervention study Setting.  An intensive care unit (ICU) and a surgical unit that was not an ICU in the Pittsburgh Veterans Administration hospital Patients.  All patients admitted to the study units Intervention.  We implemented an MRSA infection control program that consisted of the following 4 elements: (1) the use of standard precautions for all patient contact, with emphasis on hand hygiene; (2) the use of contact precautions for interactions with patients known to be infected or colonized with MRSA; (3) the use of active surveillance cultures to identify patients who were asymptomatically colonized with MRSA; and (4) use of an industrial systems-engineering approach, the Toyota Production System, to facilitate consistent and reliable adherence to the infection control program. Results.  The rate of healthcare-associated MRSA infection in the surgical unit decreased from 1.56 infections per 1,000 patient-days in the 2 years before the intervention to 0.63 infections per 1,000 patient-days in the 4 years after the intervention (a 60% reduction; P = .003). The rate of healthcare-associated MRSA infection in the ICU decreased from 5.45 infections per 1,000 patient-days in the 2 years before to the intervention to 1.35 infections per 1,000 patient-days in the 3 years after the intervention (a 75% reduction; P = .001). The combined estimate for reduction in the incidence of infection after the intervention in the 2 units was 68% (95% confidence interval, 50%–79%; P < .001). Conclusions.  Sustained reduction in the incidence of MRSA infection is possible in a setting where this pathogen is endemic. An industrial systems-engineering approach can be adapted to facilitate consistent and reliable adherence to MRSA infection prevention practices in healthcare facilities.

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