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Screening for MRSA: A Flawed Hospital Infection Control Intervention

Richard P. Wenzel , MD, MSc, Gonzalo Bearman , MD, MPH and Michael B. Edmond , MD, MPH, MPA
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 29, No. 11 (November 2008), pp. 1012-1018
DOI: 10.1086/593120
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/593120
Page Count: 7
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Screening for MRSA: A Flawed Hospital Infection Control Intervention
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Abstract

Focusing hospital resources on a single antibiotic‐resistant pathogen as a sole approach to infection control is inherently flawed. We applied attributable mortality principles to a basic model of bloodstream infections to outline the argument. Screening for methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus alone made sense in the 1980s, but the ongoing emergence of vancomycin‐resistant enterococci and antibiotic‐resistant strains of gram‐negative rods and Candida species, as well as the recognition of the value of team‐based infection control programs, support a population‐based approach.

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