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Norton’s Slippery Slope

David B. Malament
Philosophy of Science
Vol. 75, No. 5, Proceedings of the 2006 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science AssociationPart II: Symposia PapersEdited by Cristina Bicchieri and Jason Alexander (December 2008), pp. 799-816
DOI: 10.1086/594525
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/594525
Page Count: 18
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Norton’s Slippery Slope
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Abstract

In this article, I identify several issues that arise in trying to decide whether Newtonian particle mechanics qualifies as a deterministic theory. I also give a minitutorial on the geometry and dynamical properties of Norton’s dome surface. The goal is to better understand how his example works and also to better appreciate just how wonderfully strange it is.

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