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Epidemiologic Investigation of a 2007 Outbreak of Serratia marcescens Bloodstream Infection in Texas Caused by Contamination of Syringes Prefilled With Heparin and Saline

John R. Su , MD, PhD, MPH, David B. Blossom , MD, Wendy Chung , MD, Jessica Smartt Gullion , PhD, Neil Pascoe , BSN, RN, Gary Heseltine , MD, MPH and Arjun Srinivasan , MD, MPH
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 30, No. 6 (June 2009), pp. 593-595
DOI: 10.1086/597383
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/597383
Page Count: 3
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Epidemiologic Investigation of a 2007 Outbreak of Serratia marcescens Bloodstream Infection in Texas Caused by Contamination of Syringes Prefilled With Heparin and Saline
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Abstract

This retrospective cohort study found that syringes prefilled with heparin flush solution caused an outbreak of Serratia marcescens bloodstream infection at an outpatient treatment center in Texas in 2007. The epidemiologic study supported this conclusion, despite the lack of microbiologic evidence of contamination from environmental and product testing. This report underscores the crucial contributions that epidemiologic studies can make to investigations of outbreaks that are possibly product related.

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