Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Endemism Predicts Intrinsic Vulnerability to Nonindigenous Species on Islands

Helena Berglund, Johannes Järemo and Göran Bengtsson
The American Naturalist
Vol. 174, No. 1 (July 2009), pp. 94-101
DOI: 10.1086/598501
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/598501
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Endemism Predicts Intrinsic Vulnerability to Nonindigenous Species on Islands
Preview not available

Abstract

Abstract: While numerous efforts have been made to identify and quantify factors controlling invasibility of biological communities, less attention has been given to analyzing the expressions of vulnerability to nonindigenous species (NIS). Using the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Red List database for birds, mammals, and amphibians and the Invasive Species Specialist Group global invasive species database as sources of information, we developed a new indicator for the relative intrinsic vulnerability of islands to NIS. It was calculated from the residuals to the global relationship between the impact of NIS and their exposure to the islands. The impact of NIS was expressed as the proportion of indigenous species threatened by NIS, and the exposure was the number of invasive NIS per number of native species. The residuals corresponded to the variability in impact, about 60%, that was not explained by exposure. The proportion of endemic species on the islands was positively correlated with the relative intrinsic vulnerability and explained about 60% of its variability. The robust relationship between endemism and intrinsic vulnerability reinforces the role of long‐term isolation for the fate of island indigenous species to biological invasions and is useful in identifying vulnerable environments without having a specific invader in mind.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8