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Pilot Study of Postexposure Prophylaxis for Hepatitis C Virus in Healthcare Workers

Kathleen E. Corey , MD, MPH, Julie C. Servoss , MD, Deborah R. Casson , RN, Arthur Y. Kim , MD, Gregory K. Robbins , MD, MPH, Jean Franzini , RN, MS, Katherine Twitchell , RN, MS, Susan C. Loomis , RN, MSN, Diane R. Abraczinskas , MD, Adam M. Terella , BS, Jules L. Dienstag , MDM and Raymond T. Chung , MD
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2009), pp. 1000-1005
DOI: 10.1086/605718
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/605718
Page Count: 6
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Pilot Study of Postexposure Prophylaxis for Hepatitis C Virus in Healthcare Workers
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Abstract

Background and objective.  Hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission occurs in 0.2%–10% of people after accidental needlestick exposures. However, postexposure prophylaxis is not currently recommended. We sought to determine the safety, tolerability, and acceptance of postexposure prophylaxis with peginterferon alfa‐2b in healthcare workers (HCWs) exposed to blood from HCV‐infected patients. Design.  Open‐label pilot trial of peginterferon alfa‐2b for HCV postexposure prophylaxis. Setting.  Two academic tertiary‐referral centers. Methods.  HCWs exposed to blood from HCV‐infected patients were informed of the availability of postexposure prophylaxis. Persons who elected postexposure prophylaxis were given weekly doses of peginterferon alfa‐2b for 4 weeks. Results.  Among 2,702 HCWs identified with potential exposures to bloodborne pathogens, 213 (7.9%) were exposed to an HCV antibody–positive source. Of 51 HCWs who enrolled in the study, 44 (86%) elected to undergo postexposure prophylaxis (treated group). Seven subjects elected not to undergo postexposure prophylaxis (untreated group). No cases of HCV transmission were observed in either the treated or untreated group, and no cases occurred in the remaining 162 HCWs who did not enroll in this study. No serious adverse events related to a peginterferon alfa‐2b regimen were recorded, but minor adverse events were frequent. Conclusion.  In this pilot study, there was a lower than expected frequency of HCV transmission after accidental occupational exposure. Although peginterferon alfa‐2b was safe, because of the lack of HCV transmission in either the treated or untreated groups there is little evidence to support routine postexposure prophylaxis against HCV in HCWs.

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