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Selection, Epistasis, and Parent‐of‐Origin Effects on Deleterious Mutations across Environments in Drosophila melanogaster

Alethea D. Wang, Nathaniel P. Sharp, Christine C. Spencer, Katherine Tedman‐Aucoin and Aneil F. Agrawal
The American Naturalist
Vol. 174, No. 6 (December 2009), pp. 863-874
DOI: 10.1086/645088
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/645088
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Selection, Epistasis, and Parent‐of‐Origin Effects on Deleterious Mutations across Environments in Drosophila melanogaster
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Abstract

Abstract: Understanding the nature of selection against deleterious alleles is central to determining how populations are affected by the constant influx of new mutations. Important progress has been made in estimating basic attributes of the distribution of selection coefficients and gene interaction effects (epistasis). Although most aspects of selection are likely to be context dependent, little is known about the effect of stress on selection and epistasis at the level of individual genes, especially in multicellular organisms. Using Drosophila melanogaster, we measure how selection on 20 mutant alleles is affected by direct and indirect genetic factors across two environments. We find that environmental stress increases selection against individual mutations but reduces selection against combinations of mutations (i.e., epistasis becomes more positive). In addition, we find a high incidence of indirect genetic effects whereby the strength of selection against the alleles carried by offspring is dependent on the genotypes of their parents.

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