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Description of an Influenza Vaccination Campaign and Use of a Randomized Survey to Determine Participation Rates

Xuguang (Grant) Tao , MD, PhD, Janine Giampino , RN, BSN, PCCN, Deborah A. Dooley , RN, BSN, Frances E. Humphrey , CRNP, David M. Baron , MBA, CISSP and Edward J. Bernacki , MD, MPH
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 31, No. 2 (February 2010), pp. 151-157
DOI: 10.1086/649798
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/649798
Page Count: 7
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Description of an Influenza Vaccination Campaign and Use of a Randomized Survey to Determine Participation Rates
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Abstract

Objectives.  To describe the procedures used during an influenza immunization program and the use of a randomized survey to quantify the vaccination rate among healthcare workers with and without patient contact. Design.  Influenza immunization vaccination program and a randomized survey. Setting.  Johns Hopkins University and Health System. Methods.  The 2008/2009 Johns Hopkins Influenza Immunization Program was administered to 40,000 employees, including 10,763 healthcare workers. A 10% randomized sample (1,084) of individuals were interviewed to evaluate the vaccination rate among healthcare workers with direct patient contact. Results.  Between September 23, 2008, and April 30, 2009, a total of 16,079 vaccinations were administered. Ninety‐four percent (94.5%) of persons who were vaccinated received the vaccine in the first 7 weeks of the campaign. The randomized survey demonstrated an overall vaccination rate of 71.3% (95% confidence interval, 68.6%–74.0%) and a vaccination rate for employees with direct patient contact of 82.8% (95% confidence interval, 80.1%–85.5%). The main reason (25.3%) for declining the program vaccine was because the employee had received documented vaccination elsewhere. Conclusions.  The methods used to increase participation in the recent immunization program were successful, and a randomized survey to assess participation was found to be an efficient means of evaluating the workforce’s level of potential immunity to the influenza virus.

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