Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Description of an Influenza Vaccination Campaign and Use of a Randomized Survey to Determine Participation Rates

Xuguang (Grant) Tao , MD, PhD, Janine Giampino , RN, BSN, PCCN, Deborah A. Dooley , RN, BSN, Frances E. Humphrey , CRNP, David M. Baron , MBA, CISSP and Edward J. Bernacki , MD, MPH
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 31, No. 2 (February 2010), pp. 151-157
DOI: 10.1086/649798
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/649798
Page Count: 7
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Item Type
Article
References
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Description of an Influenza Vaccination Campaign and Use of a Randomized Survey to Determine Participation Rates
Preview not available

Abstract

Objectives.  To describe the procedures used during an influenza immunization program and the use of a randomized survey to quantify the vaccination rate among healthcare workers with and without patient contact. Design.  Influenza immunization vaccination program and a randomized survey. Setting.  Johns Hopkins University and Health System. Methods.  The 2008/2009 Johns Hopkins Influenza Immunization Program was administered to 40,000 employees, including 10,763 healthcare workers. A 10% randomized sample (1,084) of individuals were interviewed to evaluate the vaccination rate among healthcare workers with direct patient contact. Results.  Between September 23, 2008, and April 30, 2009, a total of 16,079 vaccinations were administered. Ninety‐four percent (94.5%) of persons who were vaccinated received the vaccine in the first 7 weeks of the campaign. The randomized survey demonstrated an overall vaccination rate of 71.3% (95% confidence interval, 68.6%–74.0%) and a vaccination rate for employees with direct patient contact of 82.8% (95% confidence interval, 80.1%–85.5%). The main reason (25.3%) for declining the program vaccine was because the employee had received documented vaccination elsewhere. Conclusions.  The methods used to increase participation in the recent immunization program were successful, and a randomized survey to assess participation was found to be an efficient means of evaluating the workforce’s level of potential immunity to the influenza virus.

Page Thumbnails