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Technophilic Hubris and Espionage Styles during the Cold War

Kristie Macrakis
Isis
Vol. 101, No. 2 (June 2010), pp. 378-385
DOI: 10.1086/653104
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/653104
Page Count: 8
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Technophilic Hubris and Espionage Styles during the Cold War
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Abstract

ABSTRACT During the Cold War the United States developed an espionage style that reflected its love affair with technology (technophilia) whereas the Soviet Union and the East Bloc continued a tradition of using humans to collect intelligence. This essay places the origins and development of these espionage styles during the Cold War in historical and social context, and assesses their strengths and weaknesses by drawing on examples from particular cases. While the United States won the Cold War, the East Bloc won the spy wars because of a more effective espionage style. I conclude with some reflections on the uses of history for future policy, and suggest areas for further study.

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