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Making Knowledge: History, Literature, and the Poetics of Science

James J. Bono
Isis
Vol. 101, No. 3 (September 2010), pp. 555-559
DOI: 10.1086/655792
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/655792
Page Count: 5
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Making Knowledge: History, Literature, and the Poetics of Science
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Abstract

ABSTRACT As a field of study, literature and science has gradually expanded to encompass both the impact of science on literary culture and the literary‐linguistic practices intrinsic to the production of scientific knowledge. Such transformations both reinforce and fundamentally recalibrate the detailed attention focused on scientific practice by historians of science since the 1980s. As a result, this essay and the Focus section it introduces suggest that history of science and literature and science are, in fact, interdependent fields. Attention to their convergences will yield better understanding of the performative dimensions of scientific practices and thence of science itself as a form of making of knowledge of things and events in the world of nature. Science as a form of making involves the convergence of things, material practices, and a panoply of meaningful artifacts—instruments of thought and action—that refuse any simple dichotomy between “text” and “action.”

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