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Clinical Incidence of Methicillin‐Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Colonization or Infection as a Proxy Measure for MRSA Transmission in Acute Care Hospitals

Pei‐Jean I. Feng , MPH, Alexander J. Kallen , MD, MPH, Katherine Ellingson , PhD, Robert Muder , MD, Rajiv Jain , MD and John A. Jernigan , MD, MS
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 32, No. 1 (January 2011), pp. 20-25
DOI: 10.1086/657668
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/657668
Page Count: 6
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Clinical Incidence of Methicillin‐Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Colonization or Infection as a Proxy Measure for MRSA Transmission in Acute Care Hospitals
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Abstract

Background.  The incidence of methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization or infection has been used as a proxy measure for MRSA transmission, but incidence calculations vary depending on whether active surveillance culture (ASC) data are included. Objective.  To evaluate the relationship between incidences of MRSA colonization or infection calculated with and without ASCs in intensive care units and non–intensive care units. Setting.  A Veterans Affairs medical center. Methods.  From microbiology records, incidences of MRSA colonization or infection were calculated with and without ASC data. Correlation coefficients were calculated for the 2 measures, and Poisson regression was used to model temporal trends. A Poisson interaction model was used to test for differences in incidence trends modeled with and without ASCs. Results.  The incidence of MRSA colonization or infection calculated with ASCs was 4.9 times higher than that calculated without ASCs. Correlation coefficients for incidences with and without ASCs were 0.42 for intensive care units, 0.59 for non–intensive care units, and 0.48 hospital‐wide. Trends over time for the hospital were similar with and without ASCs (incidence rate ratio with ASCs, 0.95 [95% confidence interval, 0.93–0.97]; incidence rate ratio without ASCs, 0.95 [95% confidence interval, 0.92–0.99]; P = .68). Without ASCs, 35% of prevalent cases were falsely classified as incident. Conclusions.  At 1 Veterans Affairs medical center, the incidence of MRSA colonization or infection calculated solely on the basis of clinical culture results commonly misclassified incident cases and underestimated incidence, compared with measures that included ASCs; however, temporal changes were similar. These findings suggest that incidence measured without ASCs may not accurately reflect the magnitude of MRSA transmission but may be useful for monitoring transmission trends over time, a crucial element for evaluating the impact of prevention activities.

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