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Journal Article

Experiences with and Perceptions of Information: A Phenomenographic Study of First-Year College Students

Melissa Gross and Don Latham
The Library Quarterly: Information, Community, Policy
Vol. 81, No. 2 (April 2011), pp. 161-186
DOI: 10.1086/658867
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/658867
Page Count: 26
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Experiences with and Perceptions of Information: A Phenomenographic
                    Study of First-Year College Students
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Abstract

This investigation examines experiences with and perceptions of information reported by first-year college students whose level of information literacy skill is known. Participants were identified as having either proficient or below-proficient information literacy skills based on an objective test of their abilities. Interviews were performed outside of a classroom or library context and were equally interested in imposed (school assignments) and self-generated (personal) information seeking. The study uses a phenomenographic approach to collect, categorize, and analyze transcripts from seventy-seven interviews. The resulting categories of description illustrate how conceptions of information mask and minimize the need for individuals to attain information literacy skills, the primacy of the Internet and people as information resources, limited interest in information quality, and differences in experience with and perceptions of information when imposed and self-generated contexts are compared.

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