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Gloria Anzaldúa in the Canary Islands

María Henríquez-Betancor
Signs
Vol. 37, No. 1 (September 2011), pp. 42-46
DOI: 10.1086/660174
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/660174
Page Count: 6
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Gloria Anzaldúa in the Canary Islands
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Abstract

AbstractSpain is now, more than ever, a country of linguistic, social, and cultural borders that need to be transgressed. The Canary Islands is one of the most multicultural and multiethnic areas of Spain. I am one of the very few professors who teach and work on women’s writing in my college, and I am the only one to introduce North American “minority literatures” as part of the curriculum. I face the paradox of having mostly female students who have never thought about or imagined the concept of borderlands but who are very much living in several of them, since they are members of a multicultural society and are descendents of various cultures. Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera has yet to be used in and adapted to many realities that academics are exploring, hopefully with the aim of benefiting our society.

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