Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

State of Vulnerability and Humanitarian Visibility on the Verge of Sudan’s Secession: Lubna’s Pants and the Transnational Politics of Rights and Dissent

Amal Hassan Fadlalla
Signs
Vol. 37, No. 1 (September 2011), pp. 159-184
DOI: 10.1086/660179
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/660179
Page Count: 26
  • Get Access
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
State of Vulnerability and Humanitarian Visibility on the Verge of Sudan’s Secession: Lubna’s Pants and the Transnational Politics of Rights and Dissent
Preview not available

Abstract

AbstractThe case of Lubna Al-Hussein, dubbed “the pants journalist,” who was sentenced to flogging after an arrest by public-order police in Sudan, in July 2009, became one of the most widely reported narratives about the subordination of Muslim women in the world. Her case mobilized human rights advocates, politicians, and diplomats to contest discrimination against Sudanese women and to shame the government of Sudan. In this article, I show that beyond media sensationalism and the logic of saving and shaming that characterizes human rights practices exists a feminist opposition politics concerned with equal citizenship rights and invested in protesting both local and global hegemonies and oppressions. I argue that Lubna’s pants served as a symbolic site for competing visions about morality and freedom. One vision represents a transnational hegemony anchored in a neoliberal moral ethos and in discursive practices of universal humanitarianism and human rights, and the other represents a translocal political order grounded in religiosity and bodily containment. Both visions, however, render women’s struggles visible on exclusionary moral terms. I suggest that Lubna’s transnational visibility be situated in a critical historical moment, a state of vulnerability and moral panic that characterizes the present location of Sudan in the global political map. At this historical juncture, feminist politics lend legitimacy to Sudanese translocal dissent politics and highlight women’s multiple alliances and the competing hegemonies that constrain their political struggle.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26