If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Labor of Lies: How Lying for Material Rewards Polarizes Consumers’ Outcome Satisfaction

Christina I. Anthony and Elizabeth Cowley
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 39, No. 3 (October 2012), pp. 478-492
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.1086/663824
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/663824
Page Count: 15
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Labor of Lies: How Lying for Material Rewards Polarizes
                    Consumers’ Outcome Satisfaction
Preview not available

Abstract

Consumers often find themselves in situations in which they are tempted to lie in order to obtain otherwise unattainable material rewards or financial benefits (e.g., when refunding or exchanging a product, qualifying for discounts and promotions, negotiating with a salesperson, etc.). This research examines how lying during an interaction with a service provider influences the consumer’s outcome satisfaction. Six studies demonstrate that because lying interferes with the ability to use diagnostic cues to update outcome expectations, liars are less prepared for the final outcome. This reduced outcome preparedness, in turn, leads to more polarized satisfaction judgments. These findings suggest that lying may not only have financial ramifications but that there are evaluative consequences as well.

Page Thumbnails