If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

A Crossover Trial of Antimicrobial Scrubs to ReduceMethicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Burden on Healthcare Worker Apparel

Gonzalo M. L. Bearman MD MPH, Adriana Rosato PhD, Kara Elam MPH, Kakotan Sanogo MS, Michael P. Stevens MD MPH, Curtis N. Sessler MD and Richard P. Wenzel MD MSc
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 33, No. 3 (March 2012), pp. 268-275
DOI: 10.1086/664045
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/664045
Page Count: 8
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
A Crossover Trial of Antimicrobial Scrubs to ReduceMethicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Burden on Healthcare Worker Apparel
Preview not available

Abstract

Background. The impact of antimicrobial scrubs on healthcare worker (HCW) bacterial burden is unknown.Objective. To determine the effectiveness of antimicrobial scrubs on hand and apparel bacterial burden.Design. Prospective, crossover trial.Setting and Participants. Thirty HCWs randomized to study versus control scrubs in an intensive care unit.Methods. Weekly microbiology samples were obtained from scrub abdominal area, cargo pocket, and hands. Mean log colony-forming unit (CFU) counts were calculated. Compliance with hand hygiene practices was measured. Apparel and hand mean log CFU counts were compared.Results. Adherence measures were 78% (910/1,173) for hand hygiene and 82% (223/273) for scrubs. Culture compliance was 67% (306/460). No differences were observed in bacterial hand burden or in HCWs with unique positive scrub cultures. No difference in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and gram-negative rod (GNR) burden was observed. A difference in mean log methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) CFU count was found between study and control scrubs for leg cargo pocket (mean log CFUs, 11.84 control scrub vs 6.71 study scrub; ), abdominal area (mean log CFUs, 11.35 control scrub vs 7.54 study scrub; ), leg cargo pocket at the beginning of shift (mean log CFUs, 11.96 control scrub vs 4.87 study scrub; ), and abdominal area pocket at the end of shift (mean log CFUs, 12.14 control scrubs vs 8.22 study scrub; ).Conclusions. Study scrubs were associated with a 4–7 mean log reduction in MRSA burden but not VRE or GNRs. A prospective trial is needed to measure the impact of antimicrobial impregnated apparel on MRSA transmission rates.

Page Thumbnails