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Transmission and the Wrong Kind of Reason

Jonathan Way
Ethics
Vol. 122, No. 3 (April 2012), pp. 489-515
DOI: 10.1086/664749
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/664749
Page Count: 27
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Transmission and the Wrong Kind of Reason
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Abstract

This essay defends fitting-attitudes accounts of value against the wrong kind of reason problem. I argue for the skeptical view that putative reasons of the wrong kind are reasons to want and bring about certain attitudes but not reasons for those attitudes. The argument turns on the transmission of reasons: the familiar fact that there is often reason for one action or attitude because there is reason for another. I argue that putative reasons of the wrong kind transmit in a different way to the right kind of reasons and that this fact is best explained by the skeptical view.