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Is Meat Male? A Quantitative Multimethod Framework to Establish Metaphoric Relationships

Paul Rozin, Julia M. Hormes, Myles S. Faith and Brian Wansink
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 39, No. 3 (October 2012), pp. 629-643
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.1086/664970
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/664970
Page Count: 15
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Is Meat Male? A Quantitative Multimethod Framework to Establish
                    Metaphoric Relationships
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Abstract

Metaphors are increasingly recognized as influencing cognition and consumption. While these linkages typically have been qualitatively generated, this article presents a framework of convergent quantitative methodologies that can further document the validity of a metaphor. To illustrate this multimethod framework, the authors explore whether there is a metaphoric link between meat and maleness in Western cultures. The authors address this in six quantifiable studies that involve (1) implicit associations, (2) free associations, (3) indirect-scenario-based inferences, (4) direct measurement profiling, (5) preference and choice, and (6) linguistic analysis and conclude that there is a metaphoric relationship between mammal muscle meat and maleness.

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