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Trends in Hospitalization for Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in New York City, 1997–2006: Data from New York State’s Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System

Amanda M. Farr MPH, Brandon Aden MD MPH, Don Weiss MD MPH, Denis Nash PhD MPH and Melissa A. Marx PhD MPH
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 33, No. 7 (July 2012), pp. 725-731
DOI: 10.1086/666329
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/666329
Page Count: 7
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Trends in Hospitalization for Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in New York City, 1997–2006: Data from New York State’s Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System
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Abstract

Objective. To describe trends in hospitalizations with community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection in New York City over 10 years and to explore the demographics and comorbidities of patients hospitalized with CA-MRSA infections.Design. Retrospective analysis of hospital discharges from New York State’s Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database from 1997 to 2006.Patients. All patients greater than 1 year of age admitted to New York hospitals with diagnosis codes indicating MRSA who met the criteria for CA-MRSA on the basis of admission information and comorbidities.Methods. We determined hospitalization rates and compared demographics and comorbidities of patients hospitalized with CA-MRSA versus those hospitalized with all other non-MRSA diagnoses by multivariable logistic regression.Results. Of 18,226 hospitalizations with an MRSA diagnosis over 10 years, 3,579 (20%) were classified as community-associated. The CA-MRSA hospitalization rate increased from 1.47 to 10.65 per 100,000 people overall from 1997 to 2006. Relative to non-MRSA hospitalizations, men, children, Bronx and Manhattan residents, the homeless, patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and persons with diabetes had higher adjusted odds of CA-MRSA hospitalization.Conclusions. The CA-MRSA hospitalization rate appeared to increase between 1997 and 2006 in New York City, with residents of the Bronx and Manhattan, men, and persons with HIV infection or diabetes at increased odds of hospitalization with CA-MRSA. Further studies are needed to explore how changes in MRSA incidence, access to care, and other factors may have impacted these rates.

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