Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Serologic Testing for Protection against Hepatitis B Virus Infection among Students at a Health Sciences University in the United States

Philip R. Spradling MD, Roxanne E. Williams MD MPH, Jian Xing PhD, Kenneth Soyemi MD and Joseph Towers DO
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 33, No. 7 (July 2012), pp. 732-736
DOI: 10.1086/666335
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/666335
Page Count: 5
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
Item Type
Article
References
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Serologic Testing for Protection against Hepatitis B Virus Infection among Students at a Health Sciences University in the United States
Preview not available

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate hepatitis B vaccination coverage and documentation of vaccine-induced immunity.Design. Retrospective cohort analysis.Setting. Graduate school in the United States with programs in osteopathic medicine, dentistry, and allied health.Methods. Data collected included demographics, dates of hepatitis B vaccine doses, and postvaccination concentrations of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs), with dates. The proportions of students with anti-HBs of 10 IU/L or more by demographics, age at vaccination, interval since completion of the primary series, and response to additional vaccine doses were compared.Results. Of 3,452 students who matriculated during 2004–2009, 2,643 had complete data; 2,481 (93.9%) received 3 primary doses. Most were women (64.6%), US-born (85.6%), and white (63.2%); median age at receipt of the primary series was 14.5 years (interquartile range, 11.6–20.2 years) and at postvaccination testing was 23.2 years (interquartile range, 22.1–24.8 years). Of those who received 3 primary doses, 2,306 (92.9%) had an anti-HBs postvaccination concentration of 10 IU/L or more. Younger age at vaccination and longer time interval from vaccination to anti-HBs testing were associated with a postvaccination concentration of less than 10 IU/L ( and , respectively, Cochran-Armitage test for trend). Almost all students (98.2%) who initially had less than 10 IU/L of anti-HBs, but then received at least 1 additional dose, had a follow-up anti-HBs concentration of 10 IU/L or more.Conclusions. Almost all students had serologic evidence of protection against hepatitis B virus infection; most were vaccinated as adolescents and were tested more than 10 years after vaccination. Among students with anti-HBs concentrations of less than 10 IU/L, nearly all had 10 IU/L or more after at least 1 additional vaccine dose.

Page Thumbnails