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Slow Down! Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Avoidable Satiation

Jeff Galak, Justin Kruger and George Loewenstein
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 39, No. 5 (February 2013), pp. 993-1009
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.1086/666597
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/666597
Page Count: 17
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Slow Down! Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Avoidable
                    Satiation
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Abstract

Consumers often choose how quickly to consume things they enjoy. The research presented here demonstrates that they tend to consume too rapidly, growing tired of initially well-liked stimuli such as a favorite snack (experiments 1 and 4) or an enjoyable video game (experiments 2 and 3) more quickly than they would if they slowed consumption. The results also demonstrate that such overly rapid consumption results from a failure to appreciate that longer breaks between consumption episodes slow satiation. The results present a paradox: Participants who choose their own rate of consumption experience less pleasure than those who have a slower rate of consumption chosen for them.

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