If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Reassessing Inflorescence and Floral Morphology and Development in Hedyosmum (Chloranthaceae)

María Gabriela Doria, Natalia Pabón-Mora and Favio González
International Journal of Plant Sciences
Vol. 173, No. 7 (September 2012), pp. 735-750
DOI: 10.1086/666662
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/666662
Page Count: 16
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Reassessing Inflorescence and Floral Morphology and Development in Hedyosmum (Chloranthaceae)
Preview not available

Abstract

Hedyosmum (Chloranthaceae), one of the oldest angiosperm lineages, possesses some atypical reproductive features that remain poorly understood, including the inflorescence architecture, the stamen anatomy, and the perianth development around the allegedly inferior ovary. Our developmental survey of these characters with LM and SEM techniques showed that both staminate and carpellate partial inflorescences are indeterminate and suggests that each stamen corresponds to a single, ebracteolate flower. The tapetum is secretory and associated with orbicules; the connective apex is secretory, which—along with the reticulate pollen and the frequent visits of insects—suggests that entomophily should not be ruled out in Hedyosmum. The perianth is formed by three almost completely fused hypogynous tepals; the window is schyzogenous, unique among angiosperms, and according to the fossil record, it has been in the genus since the Early Cretaceous. Unlike any previous description, we found that the ovary is fully superior. The persistent perianth completely surrounds the fruit; in turn, they are tightly enclosed by the fused, acrescent, fleshy flower-subtending bracts, which appear to play a threefold role in protection, secretion, and dispersal.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16