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The Role of Case Study Research in Political Science: Evidence for Causal Claims

Sharon Crasnow
Philosophy of Science
Vol. 79, No. 5 (December 2012), pp. 655-666
DOI: 10.1086/667869
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/667869
Page Count: 12
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The Role of Case Study Research in Political Science: Evidence for Causal Claims
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Abstract

Political science research, particularly in international relations and comparative politics, has increasingly become dominated by statistical and formal approaches. The promise of these approaches shifted the methodological emphasis away from case study research. In response, supporters of case study research argue that case studies provide evidence for causal claims that is not available through statistical and formal research methods, and many have advocated multimethod research. I propose a way of understanding the integration of multiple methodologies in which the causes sought in case studies are treated as singular causation and contingent on a theoretical framework.

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