Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Are Close Friends the Enemy? Online Social Networks, Self-Esteem, and Self-Control

Keith Wilcox and Andrew T. Stephen
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 40, No. 1 (June 2013), pp. 90-103
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.1086/668794
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/668794
Page Count: 14
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Cite this Item
Item Type
Article
References
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Are Close Friends the Enemy? Online Social Networks, Self-Esteem, and Self-Control
Preview not available

Abstract

Online social networks are used by hundreds of millions of people every day, but little is known about their effect on behavior. In five experiments, the authors demonstrate that social network use enhances self-esteem in users who are focused on close friends (i.e., strong ties) while browsing their social network. This momentary increase in self-esteem reduces self-control, leading those focused on strong ties to display less self-control after browsing a social network. Additionally, the authors present evidence suggesting that greater social network use is associated with a higher body mass index and higher levels of credit card debt for individuals with strong ties to their social network. This research extends previous findings by demonstrating that social networks primarily enhance self-esteem for those focused on strong ties during social network use. Additionally, this research has implications for policy makers because self-control is an important mechanism for maintaining social order and well-being.

Page Thumbnails