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Infection Control Assessment after an Influenza Outbreak in a Residential Care Facility for Children and Young Adults with Neurologic and Neurodevelopmental Conditions

Alejandro Azofeifa DDS MSc MPH, Lorraine F. Yeung MD MPH, Georgina Peacock MD MPH, Cynthia A. Moore MD PhD, Loren Rodgers PhD, Mary DiOrio MD MPH, Shannon L. Page BS, Brian Fowler MPH, Nimalie D. Stone MD MS, Lyn Finelli DrPH MS and Michael A. Jhung MD MPH
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 34, No. 7 (July 2013), pp. 717-722
DOI: 10.1086/670990
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/670990
Page Count: 6
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Infection Control Assessment after an Influenza Outbreak in a Residential Care Facility for Children and Young Adults with Neurologic and Neurodevelopmental Conditions
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Abstract

Objective. To assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of infection control among staff in a residential care facility for children and young adults with neurologic and neurodevelopmental conditions.Design. Self-administered survey.Setting. Residential care facility (facility A).Participants. Facility A staff ().Methods. We distributed a survey to staff at facility A. We classified staff with direct care responsibilities as clinical (ie, physicians, nurses, and therapists) or nonclinical (ie, habilitation assistants, volunteers, and teachers) and used χ2 tests to measure differences between staff agreement to questions.Results. Of 248 surveys distributed, 200 (81%) were completed; median respondent age was 36 years; 85% were female; and 151 were direct care staff (50 clinical, 101 nonclinical). Among direct care staff respondents, 86% agreed they could identify residents with respiratory symptoms, 70% stayed home from work when ill with respiratory infection, 64% agreed that facility administration encouraged them to stay home when ill with respiratory infection, and 72% reported that ill residents with respiratory infections were separated from well residents. Clinical and nonclinical staff differed in agreement about using waterless hand gel as a substitute for handwashing (96% vs 78%; ) and whether handwashing was done after touching residents (92% vs 75%; ).Conclusions. Respondents’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding infection control could be improved, especially among nonclinical staff. Facilities caring for children and young adults with neurologic and neurodevelopmental conditions should encourage adherence to infection control best practices among all staff having direct contact with residents.

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