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Early Onset versus Late Onset Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Infections: An Analysis of Risk Factors and Microbiology

Paul Chittick MD, Sobia Azhar MD, Kalyani Movva MD, Paula Keller MS, Judith A. Boura MS and Jeffrey Band MD
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 34, No. 9 (September 2013), pp. 980-983
DOI: 10.1086/671726
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/671726
Page Count: 4
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Early Onset versus Late Onset Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Infections: An Analysis of Risk Factors and Microbiology
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Abstract

The risks and microbiology for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are less well described than those for traditional central catheters, particularly as they pertain to duration of catheterization. We compared patients with early- and late-onset PICC bloodstream infections at our institution and found significant differences in microbiologic etiologies.

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