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Effects of Contact Precautions on Patient Perception of Care and Satisfaction: A Prospective Cohort Study

Preeti Mehrotra MD, Lindsay Croft MS, Hannah R. Day PhD, Eli N. Perencevich MD MS, Lisa Pineles MA, Anthony D. Harris MD MPH, Saul N. Weingart MD PhD and Daniel J. Morgan MD MS
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 34, No. 10 (October 2013), pp. 1087-1093
DOI: 10.1086/673143
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/673143
Page Count: 7
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Effects of Contact Precautions on Patient Perception of Care and Satisfaction: A Prospective Cohort Study
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Abstract

Objective. Contact precautions decrease healthcare worker–patient contact and may impact patient satisfaction. To determine the association between contact precautions and patient satisfaction, we used a standardized interview for perceived issues with care.Design. Prospective cohort study of inpatients, evaluated at admission and on hospital days 3, 7, and 14 (until discharged). At each point, patients underwent a standardized interview to identify perceived problems with care. After discharge, the standardized interview and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey were administered by telephone. Responses were recorded, transcribed, and coded by 2 physician reviewers.Participants. A total of 528 medical or surgical patients not admitted to the intensive care unit.Results. A total of 528 patients were included in the primary analysis, of whom 104 (20%) perceived some issue with their care. On multivariable logistic regression, contact precautions were independently associated with a greater number of perceived concerns with care (odds ratio, 2.05 [95% confidence interval, 1.31–3.21]; ), including poor coordination of care () and a lack of respect for patient needs and preferences (). Eighty-eight patients were included in the secondary analysis of HCAHPS. Patients under contact precautions did not have different HCAHPS scores than those not under contact precautions (odds ratio, 1.79 [95% confidence interval, 0.64–5.00]; ).Conclusions. Patients under contact precautions were more likely to perceive problems with their care, especially poor coordination of care and a lack of respect for patient preferences.

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