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The Entourage Effect

Brent McFerran and Jennifer J. Argo
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 40, No. 5 (February 2014), pp. 871-884
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.1086/673262
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/673262
Page Count: 14
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The Entourage Effect
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Abstract

Across a series of studies conducted in both the field and the laboratory, the authors demonstrate that the presence of others (i.e., an entourage) alters a VIP’s personal feelings of status. Specifically, the authors show that VIPs feel higher levels of status when they are able to experience preferential treatment with an entourage, even if this results in the rewards associated with the treatment becoming less scarce. We show that the effect is driven by an increase in feelings of connection with one’s guests. Several alternative explanations for the entourage effect are ruled out, and implications for practice are discussed.

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