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On Where Things Could Be

Jeffrey Sanford Russell
Philosophy of Science
Vol. 81, No. 1 (January 2014), pp. 60-80
DOI: 10.1086/674344
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/674344
Page Count: 21
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On Where Things Could Be
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Abstract

Some philosophers respond to Leibniz’s “shift” argument against absolute space by appealing to antihaecceitism about possible worlds, using David Lewis’s counterpart theory. But separated from Lewis’s distinctive system, it is difficult to understand what this doctrine amounts to or how it bears on the Leibnizian argument. In fact, the best way of making sense of the relevant kind of antihaecceitism concedes the main point of the Leibnizian argument, pressing us to consider alternative spatiotemporal metaphysics.

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