Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Introduction

Stuart McCook
Isis
Vol. 104, No. 4 (December 2013), pp. 773-776
DOI: 10.1086/674943
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/674943
Page Count: 4
Subjects: History of Science & Technology
Find more content in these subjects: History of Science & Technology
  • Download PDF
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
We're having trouble loading this content. Download PDF instead.

Page Thumbnails

Abstract

ABSTRACTThe “global turn” in the history of science offers new ways to think about how to do national and regional histories of science, in this case the history of science in Latin America. For example, it questions structuralist and diffusionist models of the spread of science and shows the often active role that people in Latin America (and the rest of the Global South) played in the construction of “universal” scientific knowledge. It suggests that even national or regional histories of science must be situated in a global context; all too often, such histories have treated global processes as a distant backdrop. At the same time, historians need to pay constant attention to the role of power in the construction of scientific knowledge. Finally, this essay highlights a methodological tool for writing globally inflected histories of science: the method of “following.”