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Understanding Staff Perceptions about Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase–Producing Enterobacteriaceae Control Efforts in Chicago Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals

Rosie D. Lyles MD MHA, Nicholas M. Moore MS, Shayna B. Weiner MPH, Monica Sikka MD, Michael Y. Lin MD MPH, Robert A. Weinstein MD, Mary K. Hayden MD, Ronda L. Sinkowitz-Cochran MPH and for the CDC Prevention Epicenters Program
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Vol. 35, No. 4, Special Topic Issue: Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Multidrug-Resistant Organisms (April 2014), pp. 367-374
DOI: 10.1086/675596
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/675596
Page Count: 8
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Understanding Staff Perceptions about Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase–Producing Enterobacteriaceae Control Efforts in Chicago Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals
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Abstract

Objective. To identify differences in organizational culture and better understand motivators to implementation of a bundle intervention to control Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase–producing Enterobacteriaceae (KPC).Design. Mixed-methods study.Setting. Four long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) in Chicago.Participants. LTACH staff across 3 strata of employees (administration, midlevel management, and frontline clinical workers).Methods. Qualitative interviews or focus groups and completion of a quantitative questionnaire.Results. Eighty employees (frontline, 72.5%; midlevel, 17.5%; administration, 10%) completed surveys and participated in qualitative discussions in August 2012. Although 82.3% of respondents felt that quality improvement was a priority at their LTACH, there were statistically significant differences in organizational culture between staff strata, with administrative-level having higher organizational culture scores (ie, more favorable responses) than midlevel or frontline staff. When asked to rank the success of the KPC control program, mean response was 8.0 (95% confidence interval, 7.6–8.5), indicating a high level of agreement with the perception that the program was a success. Patient safety and personal safety were reported most often as personal motivators for intervention adherence. The most convergent theme related to prevention across groups was that proper hand hygiene is vital to prevention of KPC transmission.Conclusions. Despite differences in organizational culture across 3 strata of LTACH employees, the high degree of convergence in motivation, understanding, and beliefs related to implementation of a KPC control bundle suggests that all levels of staff may be able to align perspectives when faced with a key infection control problem and quality improvement initiative.

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